16th Sep 1916. Round-up for Shirkers at Rugby

ROUND-UP FOR SHIRKERS AT RUGBY.

On Friday evening last week, and again on Saturday, the local police, in conjunction with the Military Authorities, had a round-up for the purpose of ascertaining how many men are shirking their obligations under the Military Service Act. The Empire, Palace, and the railway stations were visited, and men of military age were challenged to produce their papers. Men were also accosted by police officers in the streets. So thoroughly had the Military Authorities locally done their work, however, that, although a number of men who failed to produce their papers were escorted to the Police Station, they were all able to give satisfactory explanations of their presence in civil life. Both the military and police carried out their duties in a courteous manner, and people generally cheerfully acquiesced on the request, “ Show your papers, please ! ”

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.
TUESDAY. Before Dr Clement Dukes (in the chair), T Hunter, T A Wise, J E Cox, and J J McKinnell, Esqrs.

WAR PENSIONS SUB-COMMITTEE IMPOSED UPON.

Grace Anderson, late of Holbrooke Avenue, Rugby, who had been arrested at Woodville, near Burton-on-Trent, was charged on remand with obtaining £2 by false pretences from Agatha Mary West, at Rugby, on August 11th.—On the date named Mrs West was acting as temporary secretary to the local War Pensions Sub-Committee. Prisoner called upon her and represented that she was the widow of Sergt Alec Anderson, of the 1st Battalion Scots Guards, who was killed in action at Loos on September 25th last year. She said she was entitled to a pension, and, believing her story to be true, Mrs West advanced her £2. When enquiries were made of the Officer commanding the 1st Scots Guards it was found that no such man as Sergt Anderson had ever belonged to the battalion. Prisoner had then left the town, and a warrant for her arrest was issued.

The Magistrates’ Clerk said he had seen a letter, in which defendant alleged it was true her husband was killed as stated. If that was so she had better plead not guilty.

Defendant said her husband was killed, and that his name was Anderson, but she gave the wrong number and the wrong battalion, she was not entitled to any more money from the War Pensions Committee.—Mr H Lupton Reddish, solicitor, Rugby, prosecuted.

Mrs West said on the 11th prox. she was acting as secretary temporarily to the local War Pensions Committee of the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Families Association. Defendant came to see her, and from information she gave witness filled up the form produced, which defendant signed as correct. This form stated that the pension awarded to the applicant was 10s, and the date of award March 16th. Defendant requested that 10s should be advanced that day, and that the committee would help her to find her a place as cook, which they did. Witness advanced her 10s by way of loan. That afternoon or next day defendant called on witness at Bilton. She said she had got a place, and asked for an advance to get clothing. Witness then advanced her 30s, making £2 in all. She told witness that when she was in service she would not need her pension, and would pay the money back as soon as the pension became due.

Asked what she had to say, defendant said she would not have done it had she not been hard up. Her papers were at her home in Liverpool, and she had not written for them because she did not wish her friends to know of the case. Her husband was in the King’s Liverpool Regiment, and since March she had regularly received her pension. She came into the Rugby district because she thought a change would do her good.

Supt Clarke said defendant’s proper name was Grace Lester, and she had undergone one month’s hard labour in 1913 for stealing by trick two ladies’ dresses.

Defendant, whilst admitting the conviction, said she was married to Anderson in 1914.—Supt Clarke said he knew nothing of the man referred to in the letter produced, but he had refused to go bail for defendant. The police had interviewed defendant’s parents, who had not seen her for three years, and declined to have anything to do with her.

The Chairman told defendant a very serious charge was brought against her, and she seemed to have a very bad character. They sent her to Warwick Gaol for three months with hard labour.

[Messrs Hunter and McKinnell, being members of the War Pensions Sub-Committee, did not adjudicate in this case.]

THE TRIBUNALS AT WORK.
COUNTY APPEAL TRIBUNAL.

Mr W K Pridmore (Mayor of Coventry) presided at the Appeal Tribunal held at the Benn Buildings on Wednesday evening. Others present were : Messrs W Johnson, jun, K Rotherham, and W Hill. Mr M E T Wratislaw and Mr F M Burton were the Military representatives.

Frank Walding, boot and shoe dealer, living at 52 Caldecott Street, Rugby, who had been exempted by the Tribunal till September 1st, made application for a further period on business grounds, but this was refused.—Exemption till January 1st. 1917, was given to Horace William Dale, a coal carter, living at 28 Bridge Street, whose previous exemption had expired.—William Henry Smith, plasterer and fitter, Birdingbury asked for a further exemption, and was refused, as was also the application, on business grounds, of Ernest Archie Bromwich, Newton House Farm, Rugby.— Mr Bromwich : Well, I shall sell my farm up. I will see an auctioneer at once.—The Chairman : Very well ; go now. Don’t stand here.

The Military appealed against an additional exemption which had been granted to Joseph Hill, Pailton, and this was upheld, on the Military promising not to serve calling-up papers until October 15th.—Thomas Watts, Stretton-on-Dunsmore, canal labourer and puddler, appealed on business grounds, and was given conditional exemption.—The Military appealed against the conditional exemption which had been granted by the Tribunal to Arthur Williams, a charge hand and refuse destructor at the Urban Council refuse disposal works. The appeal was upheld, and exemption given till October 14th.

The Military also appealed against the additional exemption till October 1st which had been granted to Horace Walter Gilbert, electrician and wireman, living at 58 Newland Street, New Bilton, and this case was adjourned.—Hercules Castley, 22 James Street, carpenter and joiner, appealed on medical grounds, and against the decision of the Rugby Urban Tribunal. This also was adjourned for the case to again go before the Medical Authorities at Budbrooke.—Joseph George Bennett, carriage builder and wheelwright, 7 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, appealed against the withdrawal of the exemption which had been granted to him, and he was given till December 1st.—Archie Ernest Robinson, tobacconist and off-licensed retailer, living at 1 Abbey Street, appealed against the decision of the Urban District Council, but their decision was upheld.—Evan Harris Lloyd, farmer, Brownsover, appealed against the decision of the Rural District Tribunal withdrawing his conditional exemption, and the case was adjourned for the Military to find a substitute.—Ernest Tomlin, grocer, draper, etc, of Dunchurch, asked for exemption, and was given until January 17th by agreement, this to be final.—The application of Horace Basil Wane, schoolmaster, of Bilton Grange, was refused.—Walter Russell, Whitehall Farm, whose exemption had been withdrawn, appealed against this, but his application was refused, the Military promising not to serve the papers until the 15th October.

Freddie Cooper, Brinklow, labourer and haulier’s carter, whose exemption had been withdrawn, unsuccessfully appealed against the decision.-Sidney George College, bread baker and corn dealer, of Brandon, who had been given exemption till September 15th without further appeal without permission, was now given till October 14th.—William Frederick Brooks, carrier, Flecknoe, appealed for exemption, but this case was adjourned for a substitute to be found by the Military.—The appeal of Edward William Steane, jun, batcher, of Marton, was refused by the Tribunal.—Frank William Goode, shepherd and horseman, of Broadwell, was given one month exemption, final, and, as he was an unattested man, this will carry two months.

MUNITION WORKERS WASTING TIME.—Cecil Winn, apprentice, 12 Railway Terrace, Rugby, claimed through Samuel Winn, his father, a shell turner, from Harry Carter, machinist, 14 Railway Terrace, Rugby, to recover possession of a show Homer pigeon, value 5s, wrongfully detained by defendant.—The case was heard late in the afternoon, and Samuel Winn said his son had been fetched back to work.—Defendant said it was a “ blooming ” neighbour’s quarrel, and the pigeon was a stray one.—His Honor elicited the information that both men were working on munitions, and said they were wasting time by coming into Court over a pigeon worth only 2s 6d or 3s. He awarded the pigeon to plaintiff, with no reflection on anybody, and expressed the hope that this would be the end of the quarrel.

OVERSTAYING HIS LEAVE.—Lance-Corpl Harry Gilbert, who had been arrested at 6 St Matthew Street, Rugby, was charged with being an absentee without leave from the 1st Royal Warwicks. He said he came out of hospital on sick leave, and should have gone back on Tuesday night.—P.S Goodwin said a telegram was received instructing the police to arrest, and when he acted upon it the previous morning he found Gilbert fully dressed and with his bag packed ready to go away.—Defendant said he had a railway warrant to return if he was allowed to do so ; but the Magistrate decided to remand him to await an escort.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr L W Eadon, second son of Mr W Eadon, of Hillmorton Road, who enlisted in the H.A.C soon after the outbreak of the War, has been gazetted to a second lieutenancy in the R.F.A.

Mr B C Simmonds, son of Mr W T Simmonds, headmaster of the Elborow School, and Mr Everard Turner, son of Mr E Turner, of 30 Lancaster Road, Rugby, have been gazetted to second lieutenancies in the Infantry Machine Gun Corps. Mr Turner has already seen active service with the Oxford and Bucks L.I. in France.

Mr T Collins, of 37 Stephen Street, Rugby, has received a letter from his second son, Rifleman R Collins, of the Rifle Brigade, stating that he was wounded in a German trench, which had been captured three hours before. He had two wounds in the left thigh, one in the right, and one in the right shoulder. Rifleman Collins, who is now in a Military Hospital at Stockport, is an old St Matthew’s boy, and previous to the War was employed by Messrs Parnell & Son. Although he is not quite 19 years of age, this is the second time he has been wounded, the first occasion being at Ypres over twelve months ago. He enlisted on September 3, 1914.

PTE F J SUMMERS NOTIFIED AS KILLED.

Mr F H Summers, of Bridget Street, has received a notification from the War Office that his son, Pte F J Summers, Oxford & Bucks L.I, missing since September 25th of last year, is killed. Pte Summers was an old boy of St Matthew’s School, and a prominent, junior footballer and athlete.

ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOYS WOUNDED.

Amongst the casualties in the great advance are Gunner F Favell, R.G.A, Rifleman R Collins, Rifle Brigade, Pte E J Hewitt, Royal Warwickshire Regt, and Pte A Barrows, Dorset Regt, all wounded.

B.T.H CASUALITIES.

Great regret will be felt by employees at the B.T.H at the news that Corpl Frank Thistlewood, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has been killed in the recent advance. Corpl Thistlewood, who was 35 years of age, enlisted in September, 1915, prior to which date he had been employed for several years in the Cost Statistics Department. He was a native of Leamington.

Official news has been received at the B.T.H that Pte Newell, of the Royal Fusiliers, has been posted as missing since August 7th last, and his parents have received private intimation that he was killed on that date. Pte Newell enlisted early in the year, and was formerly employed in the B.T.H Drawing Office. He was a native of Nottingham, and was well known in B.T.H athletic circles.

Sergt J D Sutton and Lance-Sergt A J L Moore have been wounded—the latter seriously and the former in the stomach with shrapnel. Both were natives of Loughborough, and enlisted in the same battalion of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, as Corpl Thistlewood, in September, 1914. Sergt J D Sutton was employed in the Accountancy Department, and Sergt Moore, who was visited by his mother in France, in the Cost Department.

BRANDON.

MR & MRS HENRY BARNETT, of Brandon, have received news that their son, Corpl Wilfred Barnett, of the K.R.R, has been wounded. His escape from death was lucky, as the missile happened to strike a cigarette-case he had in his pocket, and deflected it on to his head. His brother Albert, some few weeks ago, was struck in 90 places by shrapnel, but is now recovering.

DUNCHURCH.

CASUALTIES.—Pte W Wilkes (Mill Street), of the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, has been wounded in the foot and leg, and is in hospital at Halifax, going on fairly well ; and Sergt C T Hedgcock, of the 22nd Brigade, Machine Gun Company, has been wounded in the head.

BRINKLOW.

PTE FRANCIS COMPTON, nephew of Mr W Compton, of Brinklow, has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery on the field.

CLIFTON.

Mr James Morton, the sub-postmaster here, has been called up, and it now in the Durham L.I.

WOLSTON.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—Pte W Barker, Royal Warwicks, has been wounded in the arm and is in hospital. He is the second son of Mr N Barker.—Pte J E Flowers, the second son of Mr John Flowers, of Brook Street, is in hospital at Newport, Mon., having had one of his fingers blown off. He has been in France about 18 months, and has been in a number of engagements at Ypres with the Rifle Brigade.
NEW ATTENDANCE OFFICER.-Mr Gumbley, of Warwick, is now school attendance officer for the district in place of Mr A J Poxon, who is in training with the Royal Naval Flying Corps. He is an old soldier, and has six sons serving their King and country, three of whom are at present in France.

THE PARCELS sent this week by the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to local men who are prisoners of war in Germany contained :- ¼lb of tea, 1lb sugar, 1 tin of herrings in tomatoes, 1 tin of condensed milk, 1 tin of baked beans, ½-lb of butter, 2-lb box of biscuits and one pair of socks.

 

IN MEMORIAM.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. Samuel George Barnett, of the 5th Oxon and Bucks, killed in action, September 25th, 1915 ; aged 21.
“ We often sit and think of him,
And tenderly breathe his name ;
Nothing left for us to look at
But his photo in the frame.
Some day our eyes shall see
That dear face still kept in memory.”

HOPKINS.—In loving memory of Frank, the beloved and youngest son of Henry Hopkins, of Long Lawford, who was killed in action in France, September 18th, 1915.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies,
And far from those that loved him best ;
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his FATHER, BROTHERS & SISTER.

MASON.-In loving memory of Sergt. Arthur T. Mason, beloved and only son.—From his sorrowing MOTHER and SISTER, 40 Rutland Gardens, Hove, Brighton.

 

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