20th May 1916. Clocks to be put forward.

THE DAYLIGHT SAVING BILL.

CLOCKS TO BE PUT FORWARDS.

The Summer Time Bill, 1916—the object of which is to reduce the number of hours during which artificial lighting is used, and so save a very large quantity of coal required for war purposes at the present time—received the Royal Assent on Wednesday, and comes into force at 2 a.m on Sunday morning.

At that hour the time at all railway stations will be advanced one hour (that is, the clocks when at 2 o’clock’ will be altered to indicate 3 o’clock instead); the change will also be made in Post Office and other Government clocks, and arrangements are being made for the alteration of public clocks generally, either at that hour or some convenient time on Saturday evening.

The altered time, which will be generally called “summer time,” will remain in force up to and including September 30 next.

During this period “summer time” will be the time for all purposes, except astronomical, meteorological, and navigation. For instance, all trains will run according to “ summer time ”—that is, a train which, according to the time-table is timed to leave, say, at 6 a.m, will leave at 6 a.m summer time, as indicated by the clock. All establishments whose hours are regulated by law will be required to observe the altered time—e.g., factories, shops, public-houses, etc. Thus, factories which work from 6 a.m to 6 p.m will commence and finish at 6 a.m and 6 p.m summer time ; and a shop, if required to close at 8 p.m will close at 8 o’clock summer time. It is suggested that employers should warn their employees before they leave work on Saturday, and advise them to put their clocks and watches forward on Saturday evening.

The public generally are requested by the Government to alter their own clocks and watches in the same way, by putting them forward one hour, during the course of Saturday evening or early on Sunday morning.

It should be noted that the Act does not affect lighting and other Orders which fix a time by reference to sunrise or sunset. In giving effect to these orders, it will be necessary to take the alteration of the clock into consideration. For instance, the sun will set on Sunday, May 21st at 7.51, Greenwich time. Vehicles must light up half an hour afterwards—i.e, 8.21 Greenwich time, which will be represented on your clock or watch (if correctly altered) by 9.21. Similarly, the reduction of lights in houses, etc, will take place an hour and a half after sunset, Greenwich. This will be indicated by the altered clock as 10.21.

LIGHTING OFFENCES.—George G Stott, manager of a clothing establishment, Hillmorton Paddox; Walter Watts, Club steward, Market Street, Rugby; Alice Readman, lady’s help, 42 Clifton Road; were summoned for not shading windows so that no more than a dull subdued light was visible outside their premises.—Stott admitted the offence, and P.C Lester said he saw a brilliant naked electric light coming from the Grand Clothing Hall, illuminating the church and churchyard. Defendant was sent for and on his arrival he extinguished the lights.—Defendant explained that at 7.15 that evening he sent the boy upstairs to a back room for a pail. It was then quite light, and there was no necessity for him the switch the light on. He had evidently did so on this occasion, and then shut the door.-This was the only light burning in the shop.-Fined £1.—Watts pleaded guilty.—P.S Percival said the light, which was situated it the back of the Rokeby Club, was not shaded. He could see the light shining through the top of the blind. There was also an ordinary street lamp in the yard, which was shaded half-way down with brown paper.—Supt Clarke said this was a very bad light. It was like a great star, and he sent the officer round to it.—Defendant said he had done the best he could.—The Chairman : Not quite; you will be fined £2.—Miss Readman said it was quite an oversight, and the light was turned half down, there being a very subdued light.—P.C Elkington said when in the Lower Hillmorton Road he saw a very bright light from the rear of No 42 Clifton Roan. On going to the house he saw a bright, incandescent gas light in the kitchen, there being no blind drawn.-Defendant admitted her responsibility, and told witness she was very sorry ; she went to bed and forgot to turn out the light.-Margaret Fullorton, called by defendant, said she was mistress of the house. The light in question which she saw after the policeman had been, was half turned down, as it had been during the evening. She had been at considerable trouble and expense to darken all the windows, but on the night in question, being overtired, defendant forgot to turn out the light.—Fined 10s 6d.

NO LIGHT.—Geo Kenney, 30 New Street, New Bilton, was summoned for riding a bicycle without a light at New Bilton on the 4th inst.—Defendant pleaded guilty, and said he did not know what lighting-up time was.—P.C Ruane proved the case, and said it was getting dusk at the time.—Fined 6s.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Thirty-four former scholars of the Baptist Sunday School have joined the Army, and five have been granted commissions. Three of these, 2nd-Lieut J Forbes, Lance-Corpl Geo Barnwell, and Stanley Stebbing, have been killed in action.

Lieut L G Neville, a son of the late Mr J T Neville, Dunchurch, and of Mrs Neville, of 1 Bilton Road, Rugby, who went through the Boer War, the Zulu Campaign, and the German West African Campaign, left England last week for the Mediterranean Force with a Territorial Regiment.

Second-Lieut C.T Morris Davies, of Rugby, the well-known Welsh international hockey player, is now on a short leave from the front, where he has been for fourteen months. Lieutenant P E Banting, of lawn tennis and hockey fame, is also home for a few days.

Lieut C H Ivens, of the 9th Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mr J H Ivens, of Hillmorton Road, Rugby, who was wounded in one of the battles in Mesopotamia, has been granted six months’ leave. The wound sustained was from a bullet which, after being deviated in its course by a rupee in his pocket, pierced the left thigh. After having been in hospital at Bombay for a time, he was on his way home, when a relapse necessitated his being landed at Alexandria, from whence he made another start a few days since.

ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOY WOUNDED.

The parents of Pte W J Payne, R.A.M.C, whose home is at 55 Stephen Street, have just received an intimation that Pte Payne is wounded and suffering from shock, and has been removed from the front to a hospital in England. Pte Payne is an old boy of St Matthew’s School.

MEDAL FOR AN OLD ST MATTHEW’S BOY

As announced in a previous issue of the Advertise, Police Constable Herbert Archer, a Rugby man, has been awarded the bronze medal and certificate of the Royal Humane Society for conspicuous bravery in rescuing a young lad from drowning at Rosyth Naval Dockyard. The presentation was formally made to P.C Archer at Rosyth on Wednesday last week by Commodore Harvey Bruce, M.V.O, R.N, in the presence of the Dockyard officials and a contingent of the Metropolitan Police. P.C Archer is an old boy of St Matthew’s School, Rugby, and, like Sergt W Bale, who was recently decorated with the D.C.M, was in 1904-5 a member of the St Matthew’s XV which won the Rugby and District Schools’ Football Union Shield in the first competition.

ANOTHER OF MESSRS FROST’S EMPLOYEE KILLED.

Messrs A Frost & Son have received intimation that another of their employees has been killed in action. Lance-Corpl Henry Hayes, of the 6th City of London Regt was fatally shot through the chest on April 30th. He had been employed by Messrs Frost for several years as a bookbinder, and he enlisted on September 2, 1914. He went to France in March, 1915, and has been through a good deal of fighting, including the battle of Loos. A few months ago he came home on leave to get married. It is interesting to note that prior to the war Lance-Corpl Hayes lodged with Riflemen Negus and Newton, two other employees of Messrs Frost, both of whom have been killed. Thirty-four of Messrs Frost’s employes are serving with the colours, and Lance-Corpl Hayes is the seventh to be killed ; several others have been wounded.

OLD MURRAYIAN AWARDED THE MILITARY CROSS.

The many friends of Bomb W K Freeman, R.F.A, son of Mrs Freeman, of 6 Lancaster Road, Rugby, will be pleased to hear that he has been awarded the Military Cross, and has been recommended for the D.C.M. Bomb Freeman is a signaller, and he gained his award by sticking to his post at the telephone under heavy fire. He was wounded in the arm and leg, and is now in the St John’s Brigade Hospital recovering from his injuries. He joined the army at Christmas, 1914, and went to the front in June, 1915. Prior to enlistment he was employed by the L & N.-W Railway in the Goods Manager’s office, Nuneaton. He is an old Murrayian and Laurentian, and brother of Sergt Jack Freeman, of “ E ” Company, 7th R.W.R.

BAND CONCERT.—On Sunday evening the B.T.H Military Band, under the conductorship of Mr H Saxon, gave a concert in the Caldecott Park. There was a large attendance.

ABOUT £10 was realised by the Rugby Branch of the National Union Railwaymen’s effort on behalf of the dependents of members killed at the front, held at Rugby recently.

THE Government have decided to instruct Local Tribunals to grant exemption in cases where, if a man with wife and family dependent were called up, his business would probably close down.

CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR SENTENCED.—P G Davies, a conscientious objector, lately employed in a Rugby ironmonger’s establishment, and associated with the Congregational Church, has been sentenced by Court Martial at Gosport to two years’ hard labour for refusing to obey military orders. News to this effect has been received by his father, who lives at Stratford-on-Avon.

CONSCRIPTS CHARGED.—George James Costello, dealer, 2 Gas Street, Rugby, was charged on remand with being an absentee under the Military Service Act, 1916, at Rugby on the 10th inst. George E Hart, labourer, 164 Lawford Road, New Bilton, was charged with a like offence.—Costello pleaded guilty, and Det Mighall said when he saw defendant the man admitted that he had received his papers, and that he should have gone up for service in March last. The reason he did not go up was that he was ruptured, and had a weak heart.—Prisoner was asked why he had not been up for medical examination, and he replied that he went to the Drill Hall, but they refused to give him a pass to Warwick because he was a conscript. He then offered to pay his own fare, but was told that this would be no good because he would not be examined.—The Chairman : Why did you not go at the proper time ?—Defendant: Because I thought that I was not eligible.—The Chairman : That is not for you to think. That is for the authorities.—He was fined £2 and remanded to await an escort.

Hart pleaded guilty.— P.S. Brown, who arrested prisoner, said Hart informed him he had received the notice, but he did not trouble any more about it.—The Chairman asked him why he did not go up, and he said he knew nothing about it.—Fined £2, and reminded to await an escort.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

Mr and Mrs Grant, Newbold, have received official intimation from the War Office that their son, Rifleman Harry Grant, of the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade, was killed in action May, 1915. Rifleman Grant was 24 years of age, and was employed at the time of his enlistment at the B.T.H. He enrolled in Kitchener’s Army in September, 1914, and has been mining since May 9th, 1915. Much sympathy is expressed with his parents. Another son of Mr and Mrs Grant has been sent home disabled, and a third son is at the present time at the front.

VOLUNTEERS’ NEED OF SHOT GUNS.

An appeal is being made by Lord Leigh, in the absence of the Lord-Lieutenant of Warwickshire, for the loan of shot guns for the Volunteer Training Corps. In Warwickshire, he states, many important munition works are guarded by the County Volunteer Regiment. Companies are organised to co-operate with the police in case of air raids, and they are of service in other ways. Only a proportion of the regiment is armed. Now a call has been made for the regiment to undertake, in case of imminent invasion, duties which will entail the employment of a number of Volunteers who are unarmed. The Field-Marshal Commanding-in-Chief the Home Defences has given instructions that in such cases men of the V.T.C who are unarmed should be provided with shot guns.

IN MEMORIAM.

DAVIS.—In Memory of 2nd-Lieut. D. C. G. Davis, R.G.A., who died of wounds, May 15, 1915.
“ We never shall our memories forget,
The friend we found so cordial-hearted.”
-From his old friends of the Electrical Laboratory B.T.H. Co.).

ELLIOTT.—In affectionate remembrance of Gunner S J. Elliott, who was killed in action at Gallipoli, May 17, 1915.
“ There is a link Death cannot sever:
Love and remembrance last for ever.”
-Doll.

 

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